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Ooby-doobies

November 26, 2017

I am trying to get a new word off the ground. Trying to launch it. The word is ooby-dooby, and it means an Uber cab. So when you decide to get an Uber, you just say, “I know, let’s get an ooby-dooby”. The problem is that no one I’ve said it to so far seems keen to adopt it. All my family dislike it and when I use it they just tell me to stop saying it. Yet I feel this word could spread rapidly with a little help. Then eventually it will get into dictionaries and I will be credited as its originator. So maybe we could all use it whenever possible? Anyone who shares or retweets this post will have my gratitude.

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6 Comments
  1. Simon Carter permalink

    Good luck but you may find doobie still carries a certain drug connotation. Think I’ll stick with App Cab!

  2. Mark Brafield permalink

    Hmmm, not sure about this one Brandon. It does, however, remind me of ‘doobree’ which was the wonderful word coined by the late and sorely-missed Kenny Everett to describe just about anything you wanted – a bit like a ‘thingumyjig’. I still use it a great deal today.

    On the subject of coining words (or phrases), a friend and I always poked fun at the strutting language of the City when we worked there, which made the speaker sound (in his mind) sexy and important but which, we suspected, no-one really knew the meaning of. ‘Leveraged buyout’ was one, and ‘poison pill shares’ or ‘golden parachute’ were others. We decided that at some particularly macho meeting, amidst all the chest – thumping, we would throw in a completely meaningless new phrase just to see who had the nerve to admit they did not know what it meant, and then watch it work its way round the City. The phrase we hit upon, which I still like, was ‘Venetian blind finance’. We never, however, quite had the nerve to put it to the test.

  3. Oh, what a shame you never put that phrase into circulation! Venetian blind finance. I’m sure it would have caught on. And someone would have invented a meaning for it.

    • Simon Carter permalink

      All the office speak phrases and buzzwords were responsible for the rise of “meeting bingo” in which they were all written down and checked off as they made their inevitabke appearance. Things could get quite tense among players waiting for “blue sky thinking” to come up before “our journey” to complete a full house after the other clichés had been trotted out.

  4. Yes – sounds like the only way to get through the meeting!

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